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Current Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 2210 (BHU) Introduction to Folklore. (online)

Introduction to major genres of folklore (folk narrative, custom, folk music and song, vernacular architecture and arts), folk groups (regional, ethnic, occupational, familial), and basic folklore research methods (collecting and archiving).
Instructor: Williams

ENGL/HIST/ANTH 5700 Folk Narrative* (online)

Forms and functions of folk narrative genres: myth, legend, folktale, memorate, and ballad.
Instructor: McNeill

ENGL/HIST 3700 (CI) Regional Folklore*CI

Communications Intensive
3 credits
Online.
Study of folklore and folklife as they relate to regional cultures.
Instructor: Gabbert

ENGL/HIST 4700/6750 Folk Material Culture. (face-to-face).

This class is a combination undergraduate/graduate class. Focuses on the history and politics of the idea of “folk art” by examining specific examples of traditional art and material culture from around the globe. Students learn to read objects as forms that illustrate cultural values and ideals. (McNeill)

GRADUATE CLASSES

Eng/Hist 6710 Space, Place, and Folklore: Folklore and Landscape

Landscapes are human creations writ large. As a kind of physical, on-going, co-authored and creative text, people shape landscapes, while at the same time landscapes evoke meanings, memories, and values in what noted anthropologist Keith Basso calls the “interanimation” between people and place. We explore productive tensions between locally constructed meanings of landscape and countervailing opinions that problematize local culture as a presumed site of authenticity, morality, and locus of the anti modern. (Gabbert)

Eng/Hist 6760 Folk Art and Material Culture. Cross listed with Eng/Hist. 4700.

This class is a combination undergraduate/graduate class. Focuses on the history and politics of the idea of “folk art” by examining specific examples of traditional art and material culture from around the globe. Students learn to read objects as forms that illustrate cultural values and ideals. (Professors vary)

Eng/Hist 6770 Legend and the Supernatural

This course explores supernatural legends and belief narratives. We will explore belief narratives and legends from cultural, popular, historical, and folkloric perspectives.

Topics include:
-Legends and scholarly approaches to them
-Ghosts in a variety of contexts
-Vampires, forensic pathology, and the movies
-“Hag riding” in oral tradition
-Culturally bound constructions of Marie Laveau and nineteenth-century New Orleans voodoo
-Media treatments of UFOs, NDEs, and the paranormal (Thomas)